How to stream PC games on Twitch

Not so long ago there was pretty much one way to interact with a video game: You sat down and played it. Maybe you watched an older friend or sibling play while pointing out all their mistakes, but gaming was never what you’d call a “spectator sport.”

That’s changed in recent years thanks to YouTube gaming celebrities, the booming popularity of professional e-sports, and most importantly, the online game-streaming service Twitch. Firing up a stream and watching someone else play a thousand miles away is now a perfectly legitimate way to enjoy a game. Best of all, anyone is free to participate on either side of a Twitch stream—PCWorld even has its own Twitch channel. If you want to be the one gaming in front of a live audience, you can start doing it today, for free.

Here’s how to stream your games on Twitch.

PC requirements: The bare minimum

This guide assumes that you have a PC with a discrete graphics card and processor powerful enough to stream games. At least to start, you’ll be running your game and uploading video and audio at the same time. There are many Twitch pros who actually use two PCs to accomplish this—one for streaming and one for gaming—but that’s a complex setup that’s beyond this beginner’s guide.

Twitch recommends that your PC has at least an Intel Core i5-4670 or the AMD equivalent, and 8GB of RAM. Your graphics card isn’t as important a consideration for streaming, but Twitch says it should be at least DirectX 10 compatible. Though if you want to play a modern game, DirectX 11 or 12 is required. (See our guide for the best graphics cards for PC gaming.)

Keep in mind that these are the minimum recommended specs, and a more powerful PC will obviously perform better. Also don’t forget about your internet connection. Twitch’s Broadcasting Guidelines says you’ll need to deliver about 4,500 to 6,000 kilobits per second to deliver 1080p at 60 frames per second, and 3,500kbps to 5,000kbps for 1080p at 30fps.

Getting started with OBS Studio 

To start broadcasting to Twitch, you’ll need two additional things: desktop software that can record and stream footage from your gaming computer, and a Twitch account. We’ll start with the software.

Options abound for desktop streaming software. You can find debates over the relative merits online, but we recommend one broadcasting suite that’s free and easy to set up—plus it integrates nicely with Twitch. The program is called Open Broadcaster Software Studio (frequently shortened to OBS Studio), which is the replacement for the classic OBS software.

BROUGHT TO YOU BY : FREELANCE WEB DESIGNER KUALA LUMPUR

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